NorfairKing's Algorithm Implementations

I have contributed 7 implementations!

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  • ackermann

    haskell

    In computability theory, the Ackermann function, named after Wilhelm Ackermann, is one of the simplest and earliest-discovered examples of a total computable function that is not primitive recursive. All primitive recursive functions are total and ...

  • euclidean algorithm

    haskell

    In mathematics, the Euclidean algorithm[a], or Euclid's algorithm, is an efficient method for computing the greatest common divisor (GCD) of two numbers, the largest number that divides both of them without leaving a remainder. It is named after the ...

  • factorial

    haskell

    In mathematics, the factorial of a non-negative integer n, denoted by n!, is the product of all positive integers less than or equal to n. For example,The value of 0! is 1, according to the convention for an empty product.The factorial operation is ...

  • fibonacci series

    haskell

    In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers or Fibonacci sequence are the numbers in the following integer sequence:or (often, in modern usage):By definition, the first two numbers in the Fibonacci sequence are either 1 and 1, or 0 and 1, depending on the ...

  • insertion sort

    haskell

    Insertion sort is a simple sorting algorithm that builds the final sorted array (or list) one item at a time. It is much less efficient on large lists than more advanced algorithms such as quicksort, heapsort, or merge sort. However, insertion sort ...

  • quick sort

    haskell

    Quicksort (sometimes called partition-exchange sort) is an efficient sorting algorithm, serving as a systematic method for placing the elements of an array in order. Developed by Tony Hoare in 1959, with his work published in 1961, it is still a ...

  • sieve of eratosthenes

    haskell

    In mathematics, the sieve of Eratosthenes (AncientGreek: , kskinon Eratosthnous), one of a number of prime number sieves, is a simple, ancient algorithm for finding all prime numbers up to any given limit. It does so by iteratively marking as ...